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Today in Health News

College Prep 101

Expert offers tips on how to help students adjust to life on their own for the first time

Today's Interactive Tools and Multimedia

Calculator: Children's Asthma Peak Flow Calculator
Podcast: Barium Swallow Podcast
Quiz: Shoulder Quiz
Risk Assesment: Understanding Your Response to Stress
Video: Peak Flow Meter

Health Tip of the Day

How to Conduct a Breast Self-Exam

  • Lie down with a pillow under your right shoulder and place your right arm behind your head.

  • Use the finger pads of the three middle fingers on your left hand to feel for lumps in the right breast.

  • Press firmly enough to know how your breast feels.

  • Move around the breast in a circular, up-and-down, or wedge pattern. Use the same pattern every time you examine your breasts. Check the entire breast area and up under your arms.

  • Repeat the exam on your left breast.

  • Repeat the examination of both breasts while standing. The upright position makes it easier to check the upper and outer part of the breasts.

  • Do the exam every month (after your period, if you have periods).

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force does not recommend breast self-exams (BSEs) because evidence suggests BSEs do not lower risk for death from breast cancer. The American Cancer Society says BSEs are an option for women 20 and older as a means of familiarizing themselves with their breasts so they can notice changes more easily. Talking with your doctor about the benefits and limitations can help you decide if you should start performing BSEs.

Healthy Living

Back and Neck Care
Millions of Americans suffer from back pain every year. The reasons for the pain are many, including bad posture, accidents, improper lifting, obesity, and weak muscles. Practice prevention to minimize your risk for back pain — get regular exercise, lose any excess weight, and learn good posture.

Health Centers

Asthma
Are you all too familiar with the coughing and wheezing that remind you that you have asthma? Asthma can be a serious problem, but it doesn’t have to stop you in your tracks. With the help of your health care team, you can keep your asthma under control.

Your Family

Children's Health
Enjoy good health at every age: know your body and how it works, eat well and stay active, and follow a plan for disease prevention.

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